Glossary of sustainability

SustainLab’s jargon-busting list of terms, acronyms and organizations

We demystify the technical language, empowering businesses to accelerate change.


This is your go-to guide on sustainability terms, whether you’re a sustainability expert, consultant, CEO or curious beginner. Here are the acronyms we all forget, the legislations to meet, the jargon to decode, and the concepts worth grasping.


At SustainLab we specialize in Sustainability data management and love sharing knowledge, but we’re always open to learn more. If you think something should be added to the list tell us all about it and let’s make this an awesome resource for everyone!



SustainLab’s jargon-busting list of terms, acronyms and organizations

We demystify the technical language, empowering businesses to accelerate change.


This is your go-to guide on sustainability terms, whether you’re a sustainability expert, consultant, CEO or curious beginner. Here are the acronyms we all forget, the legislations to meet, the jargon to decode, and the concepts worth grasping.


At SustainLab we specialize in Sustainability data management and love sharing knowledge, but we’re always open to learn more. If you think something should be added to the list tell us all about it and let’s make this an awesome resource for everyone!


SustainLab’s jargon-busting list of terms, acronyms and organizations

We demystify the technical language, empowering businesses to accelerate change.


This is your go-to guide on sustainability terms, whether you’re a sustainability expert, consultant, CEO or curious beginner. Here are the acronyms we all forget, the legislations to meet, the jargon to decode, and the concepts worth grasping.


At SustainLab we specialize in Sustainability data management and love sharing knowledge, but we’re always open to learn more. If you think something should be added to the list tell us all about it and let’s make this an awesome resource for everyone!


A


A

Abatement: The adoption of various strategies and actions aimed at mitigating the impact of human activities on ecosystems and promoting sustainable practices. This can include reducing greenhouse gas emissions, improving energy efficiency, or waste management. It’s a key concept of the SBTi Framework and refers to reductions within the value chain.


Adaptive Reuse: The process of redeveloping and repurposing existing buildings or structures for a different use, often with a focus on sustainability and preservation of historical or cultural value.


Afforestation: The process of establishing a forest, or stand of trees, in an area where there was no forest.


Agenda 2030: Also known as Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). A set of 17 goals established by the United Nations in 2015 to guide global sustainable development efforts, covering areas such as poverty, health, education, gender equality, and climate action. 


Agroforestry: An agricultural practice that combines the cultivation of trees with crops or livestock to create a more sustainable and resilient land-use system.


Alternative Energy: Energy derived from renewable sources or non-traditional methods, such as solar, wind, hydro, geothermal, biomass, or tidal power.


Atmosphere: The Earth's atmosphere consists of several layers. The troposphere is the lowest layer extending up to around 7 to 20 kilometers from the Earth’s surface. This is where weather patterns and greenhouse gas emissions are most directly felt. The stratosphere, above the troposphere, houses the ozone layer, which is vital for protecting life on Earth. The mesosphere is less directly impacted by sustainability practices but forms a crucial part of the overall atmospheric system. The thermosphere, and exosphere are the outermost layers of the atmosphere and are affected by space exploration, satellites and space debris.


AQI (Air Quality Index): An index used to measure and report the quality of outdoor air in relation to human health and well-being, often based on the concentration of pollutants such as particulate matter, ozone, carbon monoxide, and sulfur dioxide.


B

B

BECCS (Bioenergy with carbon capture and storage): A technology that combines the use of bioenergy, derived from biomass sources such as plants and organic waste, with the capture and permanent storage of carbon dioxide emissions. The goal is to mitigate climate change by removing CO₂ from the atmosphere and storing it underground.  


Beyond Value Chain Mitigation (BVCM): An approach that goes beyond addressing emissions solely within a company's direct operational activities or immediate value chain. It encompasses efforts to promote sustainability across the entire value chain, upstream and downstream, including suppliers, customers, and other stakeholders.


Biochar: A carbon-rich soil amendment produced through the pyrolysis process, which involves heating biomass without oxygen. Benefits include enhanced soil health, increased water retention, improved nutrient availability, and reduced soil erosion. Biochar acts as a long-term carbon sink, sequestering carbon and mitigating climate change by removing CO₂ from the atmosphere and storing it in a stable form. 


Biofuel: A fuel derived from renewable biological resources, such as plants, crops, or organic waste, used as an alternative to fossil fuels in transportation or energy generation.


Biosphere:  Where life exists, this sustains biodiversity and ecosystems that are crucial for human well-being. Part of the Earth’s system that also includes the lithosphere and hydrosphere.


Blue Economy: An approach to economic development that promotes sustainable and responsible use of ocean resources while preserving marine ecosystems and biodiversity.


Board Diversity: The representation of individuals from diverse backgrounds, including gender, race, ethnicity, age, and expertise, on the board of directors of a company or organization.


BREEAM (Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method): A sustainability assessment method for buildings, providing a framework for evaluating their environmental performance and encouraging best practices in design, construction, and operation..


C

Carbon Accounting: The process of quantifying and reporting greenhouse gas emissions or carbon dioxide equivalent (CO₂e) associated with an organization's activities, products, or services.


Carbon Calculator: A tool or software that helps individuals, organizations, or governments estimate and quantify their carbon footprint or greenhouse gas emissions by considering various emission sources, such as energy use, transportation, waste, and other activities.


Carbon cycle: The natural process through which carbon dioxide circulates and cycles between the atmosphere, living organisms, and the Earth's surface. It plays a crucial role in maintaining the planet's carbon balance and regulating global climate.

 

CO₂ (Carbon dioxide): A gas that’s naturally present in the Earth's atmosphere, plays a vital role in the carbon cycle, and is essential for maintaining the planet's temperature. Human activities, such as burning fossil fuels and deforestation, have significantly increased its concentration in the atmosphere, leading to global warming. 

CO₂e (Carbon Dioxide Equivalent): A standardized unit of measurement that represents the combined warming potential of all greenhouse gasses (GHGs) emitted, expressed in terms of carbon dioxide. It allows for the aggregation and comparison of different GHGs by converting their emissions into the equivalent amount of CO₂ that would cause the same level of climate impact over a given time period.


Carbon Disclosure: The systematic reporting of a company's greenhouse gas emissions, climate-related risks, and sustainability initiatives. It includes the measurement, tracking, and disclosure of carbon emissions data to promote transparency and accountability.


CDP (Carbon Disclosure Project): An international non-profit organization that encourages companies and governments to measure, disclose, manage, and reduce their environmental impacts, including carbon emissions.


Carbon Footprint: The total amount of greenhouse gasses, especially carbon dioxide (CO₂), emitted directly or indirectly by an individual, organization, event, product, or service, expressed as a carbon dioxide equivalent (CO₂e).


Carbon Intensity: The amount of carbon dioxide emissions produced per unit of activity or output, often measured as emissions per unit of energy consumed, GDP (Gross Domestic Product), or product manufactured. It helps assess the efficiency and environmental impact of different processes or sectors.


Carbon Neutrality: Achieving a balance between carbon emissions released into the atmosphere and carbon emissions removed or offset, resulting in no net increase in atmospheric CO₂ levels.

Carbon Offsetting: A mechanism used to compensate for greenhouse gas emissions by investing in projects that reduce or remove an equivalent amount of emissions elsewhere. These projects can include reforestation, renewable energy generation, or methane capture from landfills.


Carbon Sequestration: The process of capturing and storing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, often through natural means such as reforestation, afforestation, or the preservation of carbon-rich ecosystems like wetlands and forests.


Carbon Sink: A natural or artificial reservoir, ecosystem, or process that absorbs and stores carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, mitigating the effects of greenhouse gas emissions on climate change. Examples of carbon sinks include forests, oceans, wetlands, and certain agricultural practices.


Carbon Tax: A financial levy imposed on greenhouse gas emissions, particularly carbon dioxide emissions. It is designed to incentivize companies and individuals to reduce their carbon emissions by imposing a cost on each unit of emitted greenhouse gasses. The revenue generated from carbon taxes can be used to fund climate change mitigation and adaptation measures.


Carbon Tier Emissions: The classification or categorization of companies based on their carbon emissions. It is a framework designed to assign companies into different tiers or levels based on their greenhouse gas emissions and their commitment to reducing carbon footprints.


CCS (Carbon Capture and Storage): A technology that captures carbon dioxide emissions from power plants or industrial processes and stores them underground to prevent their release into the atmosphere.


Circular Economy: An economic model that aims to maximize resource efficiency, minimize waste generation, and promote the reuse, recycling, and regeneration of materials and products throughout their life cycle.


CDM (Clean Development Mechanism): A mechanism established by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) to promote clean and sustainable development projects in developing countries by allowing emission reductions or removals to be certified as tradable carbon credits.


CDP (Carbon Disclosure Project): An international non-profit organization that encourages companies and cities to disclose their environmental impacts, including carbon emissions, water usage, and deforestation risks, to investors and stakeholders.


Climate Change Adaptation: The process of adjusting to the current and projected impacts of climate change to reduce vulnerability and build resilience in natural and human systems.


Climate Neutral: Achieving net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by balancing the amount of emitted greenhouse gasses with equivalent reductions or removals.


Commodity Chain: The series of stages and processes involved in the production, distribution, and consumption of a commodity, including extraction, processing, manufacturing, transportation, and disposal.


Corporate Governance: The system of rules, practices, and processes by which a company is directed, controlled, and governed, involving relationships between stakeholders, board of directors, management, and shareholders.

Cradle-to-Cradle: A design and manufacturing approach that seeks to create products that can be fully recycled or biodegraded at the end of their life cycle, minimizing waste and environmental impact.


Cradle-to-Grave: The entire lifecycle of a product, process, or activity from its creation or extraction to its disposal or end-of-life. This concept is part of a linear economy, as opposed to a circular economy. It considers the environmental, social, and economic impacts at every stage, including raw material extraction, manufacturing, distribution, use, and eventual disposal, aiming to minimize negative effects and promote long-term sustainability.


CRC (Carbon Reduction Commitment): A mandatory emissions trading scheme in the United Kingdom aimed at large non-energy-intensive organizations to encourage energy efficiency improvements and carbon emissions reduction.


CSDDD (Corporate Sustainability Due Diligence Directive): EU regulation that refers to the steps companies take to identify and address the human rights and environmental risks in their value chains.

CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility): The commitment of businesses to operate ethically and contribute to sustainable development by considering the social, environmental, and economic impacts of their activities and implementing responsible practices


CSRD (Corporate Sustainability Reporting Directive): EU regulation that aims to enhance corporate sustainability reporting requirements for companies operating within the European Union. It builds upon the existing Non-Financial Reporting Directive (NFRD) and introduces new reporting obligations to increase transparency and comparability of sustainability-related information.


COP (Conference of the Parties): An annual gathering where countries that are parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) come together to discuss and negotiate actions to address global climate change.


D

Data Management: The process of collecting, organizing, storing, analyzing, and protecting data to ensure its accuracy, availability, reliability, and security.


Decarbonization: The process of reducing or eliminating carbon emissions from various sources, such as energy generation, transportation, industry, and buildings, to mitigate climate change.


Deforestation: The clearance, removal, or destruction of forests or woodlands, primarily for agricultural expansion, logging, or urban development, leading to habitat loss, biodiversity decline, and increased carbon dioxide emissions.


Directive: A legislative act issued by the European Union that sets out specific objectives that must be achieved by EU member states through national legislation.


DAC (Direct Air Capture): A technology that removes carbon dioxide from the atmosphere at any location, unlike carbon capture, which works at the site of the emissions. Large-scale facilities draw in air, capture CO₂ molecules, then concentrate the captured CO₂ for storage underground or to be used in various industrial processes.


Diversity and Inclusion: The practice of promoting and embracing a diverse range of individuals, backgrounds, perspectives, and experiences within an organization or society, and creating an inclusive environment that respects and values differences.


Downcycling: The process of converting materials or products into lower-value or less desirable forms through recycling, often resulting in a loss of quality or functionality.


Double Materiality: This expands materiality in corporate reporting to include both financial materiality and ESG materiality. It recognizes that sustainability issues can impact a company's financial performance and its ability to create long-term value. Includes how an organization is affected by external sustainability factors and how the organization's activities and decisions influence the broader social and environmental context.



Data Management: The process of collecting, organizing, storing, analyzing, and protecting data to ensure its accuracy, availability, reliability, and security.


Decarbonization: The process of reducing or eliminating carbon emissions from various sources, such as energy generation, transportation, industry, and buildings, to mitigate climate change.


Deforestation: The clearance, removal, or destruction of forests or woodlands, primarily for agricultural expansion, logging, or urban development, leading to habitat loss, biodiversity decline, and increased carbon dioxide emissions.


Directive: A legislative act issued by the European Union that sets out specific objectives that must be achieved by EU member states through national legislation.


DAC (Direct Air Capture): A technology that removes carbon dioxide from the atmosphere at any location, unlike carbon capture, which works at the site of the emissions. Large-scale facilities draw in air, capture CO₂ molecules, then concentrate the captured CO₂ for storage underground or to be used in various industrial processes.


Diversity and Inclusion: The practice of promoting and embracing a diverse range of individuals, backgrounds, perspectives, and experiences within an organization or society, and creating an inclusive environment that respects and values differences.


Downcycling: The process of converting materials or products into lower-value or less desirable forms through recycling, often resulting in a loss of quality or functionality.


Double Materiality: This expands materiality in corporate reporting to include both financial materiality and ESG materiality. It recognizes that sustainability issues can impact a company's financial performance and its ability to create long-term value. Includes how an organization is affected by external sustainability factors and how the organization's activities and decisions influence the broader social and environmental context.

Data Management: The process of collecting, organizing, storing, analyzing, and protecting data to ensure its accuracy, availability, reliability, and security.


Decarbonization: The process of reducing or eliminating carbon emissions from various sources, such as energy generation, transportation, industry, and buildings, to mitigate climate change.


Deforestation: The clearance, removal, or destruction of forests or woodlands, primarily for agricultural expansion, logging, or urban development, leading to habitat loss, biodiversity decline, and increased carbon dioxide emissions.


Directive: A legislative act issued by the European Union that sets out specific objectives that must be achieved by EU member states through national legislation.


DAC (Direct Air Capture): A technology that removes carbon dioxide from the atmosphere at any location, unlike carbon capture, which works at the site of the emissions. Large-scale facilities draw in air, capture CO₂ molecules, then concentrate the captured CO₂ for storage underground or to be used in various industrial processes.


Diversity and Inclusion: The practice of promoting and embracing a diverse range of individuals, backgrounds, perspectives, and experiences within an organization or society, and creating an inclusive environment that respects and values differences.


Downcycling: The process of converting materials or products into lower-value or less desirable forms through recycling, often resulting in a loss of quality or functionality.


Double Materiality: This expands materiality in corporate reporting to include both financial materiality and ESG materiality. It recognizes that sustainability issues can impact a company's financial performance and its ability to create long-term value. Includes how an organization is affected by external sustainability factors and how the organization's activities and decisions influence the broader social and environmental context.

E

Eco-design Directive: An EU directive that sets mandatory ecological requirements for the design of energy-related products to improve their environmental performance.

Eco-efficiency: The concept of producing goods and services using fewer resources and generating less waste and pollution, while maintaining or improving overall environmental performance.

Eco-Label: A label or certification mark indicating that a product or service has met specific environmental standards or criteria, such as energy efficiency, resource conservation, or reduced emissions.

Ecological Footprint: The measure of the human impact on the environment in terms of the amount of land and resources required to sustain a particular lifestyle, activity, organization, or population.

Ecosystem Services: The benefits that ecosystems provide to humans, such as clean air and water, soil fertility, climate regulation, pollination, natural resource provision, cultural and recreational values.

EEA (European Environmental Agency): An EU agency that provides independent information on the environment and supports the development and implementation of environmental policies.

Electrification: The transition from using fossil fuels to electricity as the primary energy source in various sectors, including transportation, heating, and industry, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and dependence on non-renewable resources.

E-Waste (Electronic waste): Discarded electronic devices, equipment, or components that are no longer functional or useful, often containing hazardous substances and requiring proper recycling or disposal to prevent environmental and health risks.

Emissions Intensity: The amount of greenhouse gas emissions produced per unit of output, such as energy generated, products manufactured, or services provided, usually measured in CO₂e emissions per kilowatt-hour (kWh), ton of product, or passenger-kilometer.

EMS (Environmental Management System): A framework or system that helps organizations manage and improve their environmental performance by establishing policies, setting objectives, implementing procedures, and conducting regular monitoring and audits.

End-of-Life: The stage of a product's life cycle when it reaches the end of its useful life and requires disposal, recycling, or appropriate treatment to minimize environmental impacts and maximize resource recovery.


Energy Efficiency: The ratio of useful energy output to the energy input required to perform a specific task or provide a particular service, aimed at reducing energy waste and improving resource productivity.

Energy Transition: The global shift from fossil fuels to renewable and low-carbon energy sources, driven by the need to mitigate climate change and achieve sustainable energy systems.

EIA (Environmental Impact Assessment): A process of evaluating and predicting the potential environmental, social, and economic impacts of proposed projects, policies, or activities before they are implemented, often required by legislation or regulatory authorities.

ESG (Environmental, Social, and Governance): A framework used to assess and measure the sustainability performance and impacts of companies, investments, or funds based on environmental, social, and governance criteria.

ESG Rating: An assessment or score assigned to a company or investment based on its environmental, social, and governance performance, often provided by specialized ESG rating agencies.

ESG Reporting Frameworks: Established frameworks or guidelines that provide standardized methodologies and disclosure requirements for reporting on environmental, social, and governance information, such as the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) or Sustainability Accounting Standards Board (SASB).

ESG Verification: The independent assessment and verification of a company's or investment's environmental, social, and governance performance, often conducted by third-party auditors or certification bodies.

ETS (Emissions Trading Scheme): A market-based approach to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, whereby companies are allocated or must purchase permits for their emissions.



Eco-design Directive: An EU directive that sets mandatory ecological requirements for the design of energy-related products to improve their environmental performance.

Eco-efficiency: The concept of producing goods and services using fewer resources and generating less waste and pollution, while maintaining or improving overall environmental performance.

Eco-Label: A label or certification mark indicating that a product or service has met specific environmental standards or criteria, such as energy efficiency, resource conservation, or reduced emissions.

Ecological Footprint: The measure of the human impact on the environment in terms of the amount of land and resources required to sustain a particular lifestyle, activity, organization, or population.

Ecosystem Services: The benefits that ecosystems provide to humans, such as clean air and water, soil fertility, climate regulation, pollination, natural resource provision, cultural and recreational values.

EEA (European Environmental Agency): An EU agency that provides independent information on the environment and supports the development and implementation of environmental policies.

Electrification: The transition from using fossil fuels to electricity as the primary energy source in various sectors, including transportation, heating, and industry, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and dependence on non-renewable resources.

E-Waste (Electronic waste): Discarded electronic devices, equipment, or components that are no longer functional or useful, often containing hazardous substances and requiring proper recycling or disposal to prevent environmental and health risks.

Emissions Intensity: The amount of greenhouse gas emissions produced per unit of output, such as energy generated, products manufactured, or services provided, usually measured in CO₂e emissions per kilowatt-hour (kWh), ton of product, or passenger-kilometer.

EMS (Environmental Management System): A framework or system that helps organizations manage and improve their environmental performance by establishing policies, setting objectives, implementing procedures, and conducting regular monitoring and audits.

End-of-Life: The stage of a product's life cycle when it reaches the end of its useful life and requires disposal, recycling, or appropriate treatment to minimize environmental impacts and maximize resource recovery.


Energy Efficiency: The ratio of useful energy output to the energy input required to perform a specific task or provide a particular service, aimed at reducing energy waste and improving resource productivity.

Energy Transition: The global shift from fossil fuels to renewable and low-carbon energy sources, driven by the need to mitigate climate change and achieve sustainable energy systems.

EIA (Environmental Impact Assessment): A process of evaluating and predicting the potential environmental, social, and economic impacts of proposed projects, policies, or activities before they are implemented, often required by legislation or regulatory authorities.

ESG (Environmental, Social, and Governance): A framework used to assess and measure the sustainability performance and impacts of companies, investments, or funds based on environmental, social, and governance criteria.

ESG Rating: An assessment or score assigned to a company or investment based on its environmental, social, and governance performance, often provided by specialized ESG rating agencies.

ESG Reporting Frameworks: Established frameworks or guidelines that provide standardized methodologies and disclosure requirements for reporting on environmental, social, and governance information, such as the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) or Sustainability Accounting Standards Board (SASB).

ESG Verification: The independent assessment and verification of a company's or investment's environmental, social, and governance performance, often conducted by third-party auditors or certification bodies.

ETS (Emissions Trading Scheme): A market-based approach to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, whereby companies are allocated or must purchase permits for their emissions.

Eco-design Directive: An EU directive that sets mandatory ecological requirements for the design of energy-related products to improve their environmental performance.

Eco-efficiency: The concept of producing goods and services using fewer resources and generating less waste and pollution, while maintaining or improving overall environmental performance.

Eco-Label: A label or certification mark indicating that a product or service has met specific environmental standards or criteria, such as energy efficiency, resource conservation, or reduced emissions.

Ecological Footprint: The measure of the human impact on the environment in terms of the amount of land and resources required to sustain a particular lifestyle, activity, organization, or population.

Ecosystem Services: The benefits that ecosystems provide to humans, such as clean air and water, soil fertility, climate regulation, pollination, natural resource provision, cultural and recreational values.

EEA (European Environmental Agency): An EU agency that provides independent information on the environment and supports the development and implementation of environmental policies.

Electrification: The transition from using fossil fuels to electricity as the primary energy source in various sectors, including transportation, heating, and industry, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and dependence on non-renewable resources.

E-Waste (Electronic waste): Discarded electronic devices, equipment, or components that are no longer functional or useful, often containing hazardous substances and requiring proper recycling or disposal to prevent environmental and health risks.

Emissions Intensity: The amount of greenhouse gas emissions produced per unit of output, such as energy generated, products manufactured, or services provided, usually measured in CO₂e emissions per kilowatt-hour (kWh), ton of product, or passenger-kilometer.

EMS (Environmental Management System): A framework or system that helps organizations manage and improve their environmental performance by establishing policies, setting objectives, implementing procedures, and conducting regular monitoring and audits.

End-of-Life: The stage of a product's life cycle when it reaches the end of its useful life and requires disposal, recycling, or appropriate treatment to minimize environmental impacts and maximize resource recovery.


Energy Efficiency: The ratio of useful energy output to the energy input required to perform a specific task or provide a particular service, aimed at reducing energy waste and improving resource productivity.

Energy Transition: The global shift from fossil fuels to renewable and low-carbon energy sources, driven by the need to mitigate climate change and achieve sustainable energy systems.

EIA (Environmental Impact Assessment): A process of evaluating and predicting the potential environmental, social, and economic impacts of proposed projects, policies, or activities before they are implemented, often required by legislation or regulatory authorities.

ESG (Environmental, Social, and Governance): A framework used to assess and measure the sustainability performance and impacts of companies, investments, or funds based on environmental, social, and governance criteria.

ESG Rating: An assessment or score assigned to a company or investment based on its environmental, social, and governance performance, often provided by specialized ESG rating agencies.

ESG Reporting Frameworks: Established frameworks or guidelines that provide standardized methodologies and disclosure requirements for reporting on environmental, social, and governance information, such as the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) or Sustainability Accounting Standards Board (SASB).

ESG Verification: The independent assessment and verification of a company's or investment's environmental, social, and governance performance, often conducted by third-party auditors or certification bodies.

ETS (Emissions Trading Scheme): A market-based approach to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, whereby companies are allocated or must purchase permits for their emissions.

F

Fair Trade: A trading system that promotes equitable and ethical relationships between producers in developing countries and buyers in developed countries, ensuring fair prices, safe working conditions, environmental sustainability, and community development.


F-gasses (Fluorinated gasses): A group of synthetic gasses primarily used in industrial applications such as refrigeration, air conditioning, foam blowing, and aerosols. Common types include hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs), and sulphur hexafluoride (SF6). Fluorinated gasses have a high global warming potential (GWP) compared to carbon dioxide (CO2). Due to their significant contribution to climate change, international agreements have been established to phase down the production and consumption of these gasses to mitigate their impact on global warming.


Fossil Fuel: Non-renewable energy sources derived from the remains of plants and animals that lived millions of years ago, such as coal, oil, and natural gas.


Full Cost Accounting: An accounting method that considers not only the direct costs associated with a product or service but also the indirect costs or externalities, such as environmental impacts or social costs, to provide a more comprehensive and accurate picture of total costs.



Fair Trade: A trading system that promotes equitable and ethical relationships between producers in developing countries and buyers in developed countries, ensuring fair prices, safe working conditions, environmental sustainability, and community development.


F-gasses (Fluorinated gasses): A group of synthetic gasses primarily used in industrial applications such as refrigeration, air conditioning, foam blowing, and aerosols. Common types include hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs), and sulphur hexafluoride (SF6). Fluorinated gasses have a high global warming potential (GWP) compared to carbon dioxide (CO2). Due to their significant contribution to climate change, international agreements have been established to phase down the production and consumption of these gasses to mitigate their impact on global warming.


Fossil Fuel: Non-renewable energy sources derived from the remains of plants and animals that lived millions of years ago, such as coal, oil, and natural gas.


Full Cost Accounting: An accounting method that considers not only the direct costs associated with a product or service but also the indirect costs or externalities, such as environmental impacts or social costs, to provide a more comprehensive and accurate picture of total costs.

Fair Trade: A trading system that promotes equitable and ethical relationships between producers in developing countries and buyers in developed countries, ensuring fair prices, safe working conditions, environmental sustainability, and community development.


F-gasses (Fluorinated gasses): A group of synthetic gasses primarily used in industrial applications such as refrigeration, air conditioning, foam blowing, and aerosols. Common types include hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs), and sulphur hexafluoride (SF6). Fluorinated gasses have a high global warming potential (GWP) compared to carbon dioxide (CO2). Due to their significant contribution to climate change, international agreements have been established to phase down the production and consumption of these gasses to mitigate their impact on global warming.


Fossil Fuel: Non-renewable energy sources derived from the remains of plants and animals that lived millions of years ago, such as coal, oil, and natural gas.


Full Cost Accounting: An accounting method that considers not only the direct costs associated with a product or service but also the indirect costs or externalities, such as environmental impacts or social costs, to provide a more comprehensive and accurate picture of total costs.

G

Gap Analysis: A systematic assessment that compares current performance or status against desired or target performance, identifying the gaps or discrepancies between the two. In the context of sustainability, it can refer to evaluating the progress made in achieving environmental or social goals and identifying areas for improvement.


GHGs (Greenhouse Gases): Gasses that trap heat in the Earth's atmosphere, contributing to the greenhouse effect and climate change. Common greenhouse gasses include carbon dioxide (CO₂), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), and fluorinated gasses.


GHG Protocol (The Greenhouse Gas Protocol): Developed by the World Resources Institute (WRI) and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD), provides standardized methodologies for measuring and reporting greenhouse gas emissions.


GRI (Global Reporting Initiative): An international independent organization that provides a framework for sustainability reporting, offering guidelines and indicators for measuring and disclosing an organization's economic, environmental, and social performance.


Green Building: A building design and construction approach that aims to minimize environmental impacts, improve energy efficiency, reduce resource consumption, enhance occupant health and well-being, and promote sustainable practices throughout the building's life cycle.


Green Deal: A comprehensive plan of the European Commission to make the EU's economy sustainable, aiming for climate neutrality by 2050.


Greenwashing: The practice of making false or exaggerated claims about the environmental benefits or sustainability performance of a product, service, or company to deceive or mislead consumers or stakeholders.

Green-hushing: Keeping a company’s climate strategies and sustainability initiatives hidden or undisclosed. By not discussing these strategies companies might hope to avoid potential accusations of not living up to their stated environmental goals, or to prevent accusations of greenwashing. 



Gap Analysis: A systematic assessment that compares current performance or status against desired or target performance, identifying the gaps or discrepancies between the two. In the context of sustainability, it can refer to evaluating the progress made in achieving environmental or social goals and identifying areas for improvement.


GHGs (Greenhouse Gases): Gasses that trap heat in the Earth's atmosphere, contributing to the greenhouse effect and climate change. Common greenhouse gasses include carbon dioxide (CO₂), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), and fluorinated gasses.


GHG Protocol (The Greenhouse Gas Protocol): Developed by the World Resources Institute (WRI) and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD), provides standardized methodologies for measuring and reporting greenhouse gas emissions.


GRI (Global Reporting Initiative): An international independent organization that provides a framework for sustainability reporting, offering guidelines and indicators for measuring and disclosing an organization's economic, environmental, and social performance.


Green Building: A building design and construction approach that aims to minimize environmental impacts, improve energy efficiency, reduce resource consumption, enhance occupant health and well-being, and promote sustainable practices throughout the building's life cycle.


Green Deal: A comprehensive plan of the European Commission to make the EU's economy sustainable, aiming for climate neutrality by 2050.


Greenwashing: The practice of making false or exaggerated claims about the environmental benefits or sustainability performance of a product, service, or company to deceive or mislead consumers or stakeholders.

Green-hushing: Keeping a company’s climate strategies and sustainability initiatives hidden or undisclosed. By not discussing these strategies companies might hope to avoid potential accusations of not living up to their stated environmental goals, or to prevent accusations of greenwashing. 


Gap Analysis: A systematic assessment that compares current performance or status against desired or target performance, identifying the gaps or discrepancies between the two. In the context of sustainability, it can refer to evaluating the progress made in achieving environmental or social goals and identifying areas for improvement.


GHGs (Greenhouse Gases): Gasses that trap heat in the Earth's atmosphere, contributing to the greenhouse effect and climate change. Common greenhouse gasses include carbon dioxide (CO₂), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), and fluorinated gasses.


GHG Protocol (The Greenhouse Gas Protocol): Developed by the World Resources Institute (WRI) and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD), provides standardized methodologies for measuring and reporting greenhouse gas emissions.


GRI (Global Reporting Initiative): An international independent organization that provides a framework for sustainability reporting, offering guidelines and indicators for measuring and disclosing an organization's economic, environmental, and social performance.


Green Building: A building design and construction approach that aims to minimize environmental impacts, improve energy efficiency, reduce resource consumption, enhance occupant health and well-being, and promote sustainable practices throughout the building's life cycle.


Green Deal: A comprehensive plan of the European Commission to make the EU's economy sustainable, aiming for climate neutrality by 2050.


Greenwashing: The practice of making false or exaggerated claims about the environmental benefits or sustainability performance of a product, service, or company to deceive or mislead consumers or stakeholders.

Green-hushing: Keeping a company’s climate strategies and sustainability initiatives hidden or undisclosed. By not discussing these strategies companies might hope to avoid potential accusations of not living up to their stated environmental goals, or to prevent accusations of greenwashing. 


H

Heat Island Effect: The phenomenon in which urban areas experience higher temperatures than surrounding rural areas due to the absorption and retention of heat by buildings, pavement, and other infrastructure, exacerbating the impacts of climate change.


Hydrosphere: Encompasses all water bodies on Earth, and plays a vital role in supporting life and maintaining ecosystems. Sustainable water management practices prioritize efficient use, pollution reduction, and protection of aquatic habitats, to ensure the availability and quality of water resources. Part of the Earth’s system that also includes the biosphere and lithosphere.

Heat Island Effect: The phenomenon in which urban areas experience higher temperatures than surrounding rural areas due to the absorption and retention of heat by buildings, pavement, and other infrastructure, exacerbating the impacts of climate change.


Hydrosphere: Encompasses all water bodies on Earth, and plays a vital role in supporting life and maintaining ecosystems. Sustainable water management practices prioritize efficient use, pollution reduction, and protection of aquatic habitats, to ensure the availability and quality of water resources. Part of the Earth’s system that also includes the biosphere and lithosphere.

Heat Island Effect: The phenomenon in which urban areas experience higher temperatures than surrounding rural areas due to the absorption and retention of heat by buildings, pavement, and other infrastructure, exacerbating the impacts of climate change.


Hydrosphere: Encompasses all water bodies on Earth, and plays a vital role in supporting life and maintaining ecosystems. Sustainable water management practices prioritize efficient use, pollution reduction, and protection of aquatic habitats, to ensure the availability and quality of water resources. Part of the Earth’s system that also includes the biosphere and lithosphere.

I

Impact Investing: Investments made with the intention of generating positive social or environmental impacts alongside financial returns, targeting organizations or projects that address sustainability challenges or contribute to social progress.


Integrated Reporting: A reporting approach that combines financial, environmental, social, and governance information into a single cohesive report, providing a comprehensive view of an organization's value creation, performance, and risks.


ISO 14001: An international standard for environmental management systems, providing a framework for organizations to establish, implement, maintain, and continuously improve their environmental performance.



Impact Investing: Investments made with the intention of generating positive social or environmental impacts alongside financial returns, targeting organizations or projects that address sustainability challenges or contribute to social progress.


Integrated Reporting: A reporting approach that combines financial, environmental, social, and governance information into a single cohesive report, providing a comprehensive view of an organization's value creation, performance, and risks.


ISO 14001: An international standard for environmental management systems, providing a framework for organizations to establish, implement, maintain, and continuously improve their environmental performance.

Impact Investing: Investments made with the intention of generating positive social or environmental impacts alongside financial returns, targeting organizations or projects that address sustainability challenges or contribute to social progress.


Integrated Reporting: A reporting approach that combines financial, environmental, social, and governance information into a single cohesive report, providing a comprehensive view of an organization's value creation, performance, and risks.


ISO 14001: An international standard for environmental management systems, providing a framework for organizations to establish, implement, maintain, and continuously improve their environmental performance.

L

LCA (Life Cycle Assessment): A systematic analysis and evaluation of the environmental impacts associated with a product, process, or activity throughout its entire life cycle, from raw material extraction to disposal.


LCC (Life Cycle Costing): An economic analysis that considers all costs associated with a product or asset over its entire life cycle, including acquisition, operation, maintenance, and disposal costs, to assess its total cost-effectiveness.


Lithosphere: The solid Earth's crust and upper mantle, which provides the foundation for ecosystems and human activities. Sustainable practices focus on responsible land management, soil conservation, and minimizing environmental degradation to preserve the lithosphere. Part of the Earth’s system that also includes the biosphere and hydrosphere.


Low-Carbon Economy: An economy based on reduced greenhouse gas emissions, increased energy efficiency, and the use of renewable energy sources to mitigate climate change and transition away from fossil fuel dependence.

LCA (Life Cycle Assessment): A systematic analysis and evaluation of the environmental impacts associated with a product, process, or activity throughout its entire life cycle, from raw material extraction to disposal.


LCC (Life Cycle Costing): An economic analysis that considers all costs associated with a product or asset over its entire life cycle, including acquisition, operation, maintenance, and disposal costs, to assess its total cost-effectiveness.


Lithosphere: The solid Earth's crust and upper mantle, which provides the foundation for ecosystems and human activities. Sustainable practices focus on responsible land management, soil conservation, and minimizing environmental degradation to preserve the lithosphere. Part of the Earth’s system that also includes the biosphere and hydrosphere.


Low-Carbon Economy: An economy based on reduced greenhouse gas emissions, increased energy efficiency, and the use of renewable energy sources to mitigate climate change and transition away from fossil fuel dependence.

LCA (Life Cycle Assessment): A systematic analysis and evaluation of the environmental impacts associated with a product, process, or activity throughout its entire life cycle, from raw material extraction to disposal.


LCC (Life Cycle Costing): An economic analysis that considers all costs associated with a product or asset over its entire life cycle, including acquisition, operation, maintenance, and disposal costs, to assess its total cost-effectiveness.


Lithosphere: The solid Earth's crust and upper mantle, which provides the foundation for ecosystems and human activities. Sustainable practices focus on responsible land management, soil conservation, and minimizing environmental degradation to preserve the lithosphere. Part of the Earth’s system that also includes the biosphere and hydrosphere.


Low-Carbon Economy: An economy based on reduced greenhouse gas emissions, increased energy efficiency, and the use of renewable energy sources to mitigate climate change and transition away from fossil fuel dependence.

M

Materiality: The significance, relevance, or importance of a particular issue, topic, or information in the context of an organization's sustainability performance, risks, or impacts, often determined through stakeholder engagement and impact assessment.


Methane: A greenhouse gas that’s a significant contributor to global warming and climate change. Its potent heat-trapping properties are many times greater than carbon dioxide. Methane is released through natural processes such as the digestive systems of animals, as well as human activities such as livestock farming, landfills, and fossil fuel extraction.


Microgeneration: The production of electricity or heat on a small scale, typically using renewable energy sources, such as solar panels, small wind turbines, or micro-hydropower systems, often for self-consumption or local use.


Mitigation hierarchy: An approach outlined by the Science Based Targets initiative (SBTi) that helps companies prioritize different  ways to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. 



Materiality: The significance, relevance, or importance of a particular issue, topic, or information in the context of an organization's sustainability performance, risks, or impacts, often determined through stakeholder engagement and impact assessment.


Methane: A greenhouse gas that’s a significant contributor to global warming and climate change. Its potent heat-trapping properties are many times greater than carbon dioxide. Methane is released through natural processes such as the digestive systems of animals, as well as human activities such as livestock farming, landfills, and fossil fuel extraction.


Microgeneration: The production of electricity or heat on a small scale, typically using renewable energy sources, such as solar panels, small wind turbines, or micro-hydropower systems, often for self-consumption or local use.


Mitigation hierarchy: An approach outlined by the Science Based Targets initiative (SBTi) that helps companies prioritize different  ways to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. 


Materiality: The significance, relevance, or importance of a particular issue, topic, or information in the context of an organization's sustainability performance, risks, or impacts, often determined through stakeholder engagement and impact assessment.


Methane: A greenhouse gas that’s a significant contributor to global warming and climate change. Its potent heat-trapping properties are many times greater than carbon dioxide. Methane is released through natural processes such as the digestive systems of animals, as well as human activities such as livestock farming, landfills, and fossil fuel extraction.


Microgeneration: The production of electricity or heat on a small scale, typically using renewable energy sources, such as solar panels, small wind turbines, or micro-hydropower systems, often for self-consumption or local use.


Mitigation hierarchy: An approach outlined by the Science Based Targets initiative (SBTi) that helps companies prioritize different  ways to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. 


N

Natural Capital: The stock of renewable and non-renewable natural resources, such as air, water, land, minerals, forests, biodiversity, and ecosystem services, which provide benefits to humans and contribute to economic and social well-being.


Net Zero: Achieving a balance between the amount of greenhouse gasses emitted and the amount removed from the atmosphere. It involves reducing emissions as much as possible and offsetting any remaining emissions through activities such as carbon capture and storage or investing in projects that remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.


Neutralization: The process of offsetting, balancing, or counteracting the environmental impact of certain activities, operations, or emissions to achieve a net-zero or neutral state. This is often achieved through methods such as carbon offsetting, carbon sequestration, and

carbon capture and storage (CCS).


Nitrous oxide: A greenhouse gas released as a by-product of agricultural, land use, and industrial practices including burning fossil fuels and solid waste, and during wastewater treatment.


Non-Financial Reporting: The process of disclosing information on an organization's environmental, social, and governance performance, impacts, risks, and strategies, in addition to its financial statements, providing a more comprehensive view of its overall sustainability performance.


NFRD (Non-Financial Reporting Directive): An EU legislative framework that requires certain large companies to disclose information on their environmental, social, and governance (ESG) performance in their annual reports, aiming to enhance transparency and accountability in sustainability reporting. It promotes the integration of non-financial information into corporate reporting.



Natural Capital: The stock of renewable and non-renewable natural resources, such as air, water, land, minerals, forests, biodiversity, and ecosystem services, which provide benefits to humans and contribute to economic and social well-being.


Net Zero: Achieving a balance between the amount of greenhouse gasses emitted and the amount removed from the atmosphere. It involves reducing emissions as much as possible and offsetting any remaining emissions through activities such as carbon capture and storage or investing in projects that remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.


Neutralization: The process of offsetting, balancing, or counteracting the environmental impact of certain activities, operations, or emissions to achieve a net-zero or neutral state. This is often achieved through methods such as carbon offsetting, carbon sequestration, and

carbon capture and storage (CCS).


Nitrous oxide: A greenhouse gas released as a by-product of agricultural, land use, and industrial practices including burning fossil fuels and solid waste, and during wastewater treatment.


Non-Financial Reporting: The process of disclosing information on an organization's environmental, social, and governance performance, impacts, risks, and strategies, in addition to its financial statements, providing a more comprehensive view of its overall sustainability performance.


NFRD (Non-Financial Reporting Directive): An EU legislative framework that requires certain large companies to disclose information on their environmental, social, and governance (ESG) performance in their annual reports, aiming to enhance transparency and accountability in sustainability reporting. It promotes the integration of non-financial information into corporate reporting.


Natural Capital: The stock of renewable and non-renewable natural resources, such as air, water, land, minerals, forests, biodiversity, and ecosystem services, which provide benefits to humans and contribute to economic and social well-being.


Net Zero: Achieving a balance between the amount of greenhouse gasses emitted and the amount removed from the atmosphere. It involves reducing emissions as much as possible and offsetting any remaining emissions through activities such as carbon capture and storage or investing in projects that remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.


Neutralization: The process of offsetting, balancing, or counteracting the environmental impact of certain activities, operations, or emissions to achieve a net-zero or neutral state. This is often achieved through methods such as carbon offsetting, carbon sequestration, and

carbon capture and storage (CCS).


Nitrous oxide: A greenhouse gas released as a by-product of agricultural, land use, and industrial practices including burning fossil fuels and solid waste, and during wastewater treatment.


Non-Financial Reporting: The process of disclosing information on an organization's environmental, social, and governance performance, impacts, risks, and strategies, in addition to its financial statements, providing a more comprehensive view of its overall sustainability performance.


NFRD (Non-Financial Reporting Directive): An EU legislative framework that requires certain large companies to disclose information on their environmental, social, and governance (ESG) performance in their annual reports, aiming to enhance transparency and accountability in sustainability reporting. It promotes the integration of non-financial information into corporate reporting.


O

Ocean Acidification: A reduction in the pH of the ocean over an extended period of time, caused primarily by the uptake of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.


Organic Farming: A farming system that avoids the use of synthetic fertilizers, pesticides, genetically modified organisms (GMOs), and promotes ecological balance, biodiversity conservation, and sustainable soil and water management.


Overfertilization: The excessive application of fertilizers, such as nitrogen-based compounds, phosphorus, and potassium, to soil or bodies of water. It can lead to nutrient runoff, water pollution, greenhouse gas emissions and soil degradation.


Overfishing: The excessive and unsustainable fishing of marine or freshwater species beyond their reproductive capacity, leading to the depletion of fish stocks, ecosystem disruption, and long-term economic and social impacts.



Ocean Acidification: A reduction in the pH of the ocean over an extended period of time, caused primarily by the uptake of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.


Organic Farming: A farming system that avoids the use of synthetic fertilizers, pesticides, genetically modified organisms (GMOs), and promotes ecological balance, biodiversity conservation, and sustainable soil and water management.


Overfertilization: The excessive application of fertilizers, such as nitrogen-based compounds, phosphorus, and potassium, to soil or bodies of water. It can lead to nutrient runoff, water pollution, greenhouse gas emissions and soil degradation.


Overfishing: The excessive and unsustainable fishing of marine or freshwater species beyond their reproductive capacity, leading to the depletion of fish stocks, ecosystem disruption, and long-term economic and social impacts.


Ocean Acidification: A reduction in the pH of the ocean over an extended period of time, caused primarily by the uptake of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.


Organic Farming: A farming system that avoids the use of synthetic fertilizers, pesticides, genetically modified organisms (GMOs), and promotes ecological balance, biodiversity conservation, and sustainable soil and water management.


Overfertilization: The excessive application of fertilizers, such as nitrogen-based compounds, phosphorus, and potassium, to soil or bodies of water. It can lead to nutrient runoff, water pollution, greenhouse gas emissions and soil degradation.


Overfishing: The excessive and unsustainable fishing of marine or freshwater species beyond their reproductive capacity, leading to the depletion of fish stocks, ecosystem disruption, and long-term economic and social impacts.


P

Paris Agreement: An international agreement within the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) that aims to limit global warming to well below 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels and pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5 degrees Celsius.


PFAS (Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances): A group of human-made chemicals that have been widely used since the 1940s in various industrial and consumer products. They are extremely persistent in the environment. Used in products like non-stick cookware, stain-resistant fabrics, waterproof clothing, food packaging, and firefighting foams. However, their persistence and widespread use have led to environmental and health concerns.


Planetary Boundaries: The limits within which human activities can operate safely to maintain Earth's ecological balance and prevent catastrophic environmental changes. The concept was proposed by a group of scientists led by Johan Rockström and identifies nine key boundaries that define the safe operating space for humanity. These boundaries include climate change, biodiversity loss, freshwater use, ocean acidification, and ozone depletion.


Plastics Pollution: The environmental issue caused by the accumulation of plastic waste in the environment, particularly in oceans, rivers, and landfills, posing threats to marine life, ecosystems, and human health.


Product Stewardship: The responsibility of manufacturers, producers, and suppliers for the environmental impacts and end-of-life management of their products, including waste reduction, recycling, and safe disposal.

Paris Agreement: An international agreement within the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) that aims to limit global warming to well below 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels and pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5 degrees Celsius.


PFAS (Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances): A group of human-made chemicals that have been widely used since the 1940s in various industrial and consumer products. They are extremely persistent in the environment. Used in products like non-stick cookware, stain-resistant fabrics, waterproof clothing, food packaging, and firefighting foams. However, their persistence and widespread use have led to environmental and health concerns.


Planetary Boundaries: The limits within which human activities can operate safely to maintain Earth's ecological balance and prevent catastrophic environmental changes. The concept was proposed by a group of scientists led by Johan Rockström and identifies nine key boundaries that define the safe operating space for humanity. These boundaries include climate change, biodiversity loss, freshwater use, ocean acidification, and ozone depletion.


Plastics Pollution: The environmental issue caused by the accumulation of plastic waste in the environment, particularly in oceans, rivers, and landfills, posing threats to marine life, ecosystems, and human health.


Product Stewardship: The responsibility of manufacturers, producers, and suppliers for the environmental impacts and end-of-life management of their products, including waste reduction, recycling, and safe disposal.

Paris Agreement: An international agreement within the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) that aims to limit global warming to well below 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels and pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5 degrees Celsius.


PFAS (Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances): A group of human-made chemicals that have been widely used since the 1940s in various industrial and consumer products. They are extremely persistent in the environment. Used in products like non-stick cookware, stain-resistant fabrics, waterproof clothing, food packaging, and firefighting foams. However, their persistence and widespread use have led to environmental and health concerns.


Planetary Boundaries: The limits within which human activities can operate safely to maintain Earth's ecological balance and prevent catastrophic environmental changes. The concept was proposed by a group of scientists led by Johan Rockström and identifies nine key boundaries that define the safe operating space for humanity. These boundaries include climate change, biodiversity loss, freshwater use, ocean acidification, and ozone depletion.


Plastics Pollution: The environmental issue caused by the accumulation of plastic waste in the environment, particularly in oceans, rivers, and landfills, posing threats to marine life, ecosystems, and human health.


Product Stewardship: The responsibility of manufacturers, producers, and suppliers for the environmental impacts and end-of-life management of their products, including waste reduction, recycling, and safe disposal.

R

REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals): A European Union regulation that addresses the production, import, and use of chemicals, with the goal of protecting human health and the environment.


Recycling: The process of collecting, sorting, processing, and converting waste materials into new products or raw materials, reducing the need for virgin resources, conserving energy, and minimizing waste disposal.


RED (Renewable Energy Directive): An EU directive that establishes binding renewable energy targets for EU member states and promotes the use of renewable energy sources.


Renewable Energy (RE): Energy derived from naturally replenishing sources that are virtually inexhaustible, such as solar power, wind power, hydropower, biomass, and geothermal energy.


Responsible Investment: Investment strategies that consider environmental, social, and governance (ESG) factors in addition to financial returns, aiming to generate long-term value while considering sustainability impacts and risks.


Reverse Logistics: The process of managing the return, retrieval, and recycling of products, components, or materials from consumers or downstream partners to the original manufacturer or appropriate recycling facilities.



REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals): A European Union regulation that addresses the production, import, and use of chemicals, with the goal of protecting human health and the environment.


Recycling: The process of collecting, sorting, processing, and converting waste materials into new products or raw materials, reducing the need for virgin resources, conserving energy, and minimizing waste disposal.


RED (Renewable Energy Directive): An EU directive that establishes binding renewable energy targets for EU member states and promotes the use of renewable energy sources.


Renewable Energy (RE): Energy derived from naturally replenishing sources that are virtually inexhaustible, such as solar power, wind power, hydropower, biomass, and geothermal energy.


Responsible Investment: Investment strategies that consider environmental, social, and governance (ESG) factors in addition to financial returns, aiming to generate long-term value while considering sustainability impacts and risks.


Reverse Logistics: The process of managing the return, retrieval, and recycling of products, components, or materials from consumers or downstream partners to the original manufacturer or appropriate recycling facilities.


REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals): A European Union regulation that addresses the production, import, and use of chemicals, with the goal of protecting human health and the environment.


Recycling: The process of collecting, sorting, processing, and converting waste materials into new products or raw materials, reducing the need for virgin resources, conserving energy, and minimizing waste disposal.


RED (Renewable Energy Directive): An EU directive that establishes binding renewable energy targets for EU member states and promotes the use of renewable energy sources.


Renewable Energy (RE): Energy derived from naturally replenishing sources that are virtually inexhaustible, such as solar power, wind power, hydropower, biomass, and geothermal energy.


Responsible Investment: Investment strategies that consider environmental, social, and governance (ESG) factors in addition to financial returns, aiming to generate long-term value while considering sustainability impacts and risks.


Reverse Logistics: The process of managing the return, retrieval, and recycling of products, components, or materials from consumers or downstream partners to the original manufacturer or appropriate recycling facilities.


S

SASB (Sustainability Accounting Standards Board): an independent organisation that develops industry-specific sustainability accounting standards to help companies identify, measure, and disclose financially material sustainability information to investors.

Science-Based Targets Initiative (SBTi): is a collaboration between the United Nations Global Compact (UNGC), the World Resources Institute (WRI), the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) and the CDP. It provides a methodology and criteria to support the adoption of science-based targets (SBTs) by companies to address climate change and achieve sustainability.


Scope 1, 2, and 3 Emissions: The categorization of greenhouse gas emissions based on their source or origin, as defined by the GHG Protocol. 


Scope 1 Emissions: Direct greenhouse gas emissions from sources that are owned or controlled by a company. This includes emissions from combustion of fossil fuels, such as emissions from company-owned vehicles and on-site power generation.


Scope 2 Emissions: Indirect greenhouse gas emissions resulting from the generation of purchased electricity, heat, or steam consumed by a company. These emissions occur as a result of the activities of another entity, such as a utility company, but are associated with the company in question.


Scope 3 Emissions: Indirect greenhouse gas emissions that occur throughout a company's value chain, including both upstream and downstream activities. They are emitted by sources not owned or controlled by the reporting company, such as from the extraction, production, and transport of purchased goods and services, business travel, and employee commuting.


Scope 4 (also known as avoided emissions)? I already suggest to add AE above and can refer to S4 there so it matches examples like SDGs below?


SDGs (Sustainable Development Goals): Also known as Agenda 2030. A set of 17 goals established by the United Nations to guide global sustainable development efforts, covering areas such as poverty, health, education, gender equality, and climate action. 


SIA (Social Impact Assessment): A process of identifying, analyzing, and managing the social impacts, both positive and negative, of projects, policies, or activities on affected communities, stakeholders, and broader society.


SRI (Socially Responsible Investment): Investment strategies that consider environmental, social, and governance factors alongside financial returns.


Stewardship Code: A set of principles and guidelines that encourage institutional investors to engage with the companies they invest in and promote long-term value creation while considering ESG factors.


Sustainability: The concept of meeting the needs of the present generation without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs, by balancing economic, environmental, and social considerations.


Sustainability Reporting: The practice of disclosing information about an organization's sustainability performance, impacts, risks, and strategies through dedicated reports, websites, or other communication channels to inform stakeholders and demonstrate accountability.


Sustainability Reporting Standards: Guidelines and frameworks, such as the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) and the Sustainability Accounting Standards Board (SASB), that help companies report their environmental, social, and governance performance.

SASB (Sustainability Accounting Standards Board): an independent organisation that develops industry-specific sustainability accounting standards to help companies identify, measure, and disclose financially material sustainability information to investors.

Science-Based Targets Initiative (SBTi): is a collaboration between the United Nations Global Compact (UNGC), the World Resources Institute (WRI), the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) and the CDP. It provides a methodology and criteria to support the adoption of science-based targets (SBTs) by companies to address climate change and achieve sustainability.


Scope 1, 2, and 3 Emissions: The categorization of greenhouse gas emissions based on their source or origin, as defined by the GHG Protocol. 


Scope 1 Emissions: Direct greenhouse gas emissions from sources that are owned or controlled by a company. This includes emissions from combustion of fossil fuels, such as emissions from company-owned vehicles and on-site power generation.


Scope 2 Emissions: Indirect greenhouse gas emissions resulting from the generation of purchased electricity, heat, or steam consumed by a company. These emissions occur as a result of the activities of another entity, such as a utility company, but are associated with the company in question.


Scope 3 Emissions: Indirect greenhouse gas emissions that occur throughout a company's value chain, including both upstream and downstream activities. They are emitted by sources not owned or controlled by the reporting company, such as from the extraction, production, and transport of purchased goods and services, business travel, and employee commuting.


Scope 4 (also known as avoided emissions)? I already suggest to add AE above and can refer to S4 there so it matches examples like SDGs below?


SDGs (Sustainable Development Goals): Also known as Agenda 2030. A set of 17 goals established by the United Nations to guide global sustainable development efforts, covering areas such as poverty, health, education, gender equality, and climate action. 


SIA (Social Impact Assessment): A process of identifying, analyzing, and managing the social impacts, both positive and negative, of projects, policies, or activities on affected communities, stakeholders, and broader society.


SRI (Socially Responsible Investment): Investment strategies that consider environmental, social, and governance factors alongside financial returns.


Stewardship Code: A set of principles and guidelines that encourage institutional investors to engage with the companies they invest in and promote long-term value creation while considering ESG factors.


Sustainability: The concept of meeting the needs of the present generation without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs, by balancing economic, environmental, and social considerations.


Sustainability Reporting: The practice of disclosing information about an organization's sustainability performance, impacts, risks, and strategies through dedicated reports, websites, or other communication channels to inform stakeholders and demonstrate accountability.


Sustainability Reporting Standards: Guidelines and frameworks, such as the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) and the Sustainability Accounting Standards Board (SASB), that help companies report their environmental, social, and governance performance.

SASB (Sustainability Accounting Standards Board): an independent organisation that develops industry-specific sustainability accounting standards to help companies identify, measure, and disclose financially material sustainability information to investors.

Science-Based Targets Initiative (SBTi): is a collaboration between the United Nations Global Compact (UNGC), the World Resources Institute (WRI), the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) and the CDP. It provides a methodology and criteria to support the adoption of science-based targets (SBTs) by companies to address climate change and achieve sustainability.


Scope 1, 2, and 3 Emissions: The categorization of greenhouse gas emissions based on their source or origin, as defined by the GHG Protocol. 


Scope 1 Emissions: Direct greenhouse gas emissions from sources that are owned or controlled by a company. This includes emissions from combustion of fossil fuels, such as emissions from company-owned vehicles and on-site power generation.


Scope 2 Emissions: Indirect greenhouse gas emissions resulting from the generation of purchased electricity, heat, or steam consumed by a company. These emissions occur as a result of the activities of another entity, such as a utility company, but are associated with the company in question.


Scope 3 Emissions: Indirect greenhouse gas emissions that occur throughout a company's value chain, including both upstream and downstream activities. They are emitted by sources not owned or controlled by the reporting company, such as from the extraction, production, and transport of purchased goods and services, business travel, and employee commuting.


Scope 4 (also known as avoided emissions)? I already suggest to add AE above and can refer to S4 there so it matches examples like SDGs below?


SDGs (Sustainable Development Goals): Also known as Agenda 2030. A set of 17 goals established by the United Nations to guide global sustainable development efforts, covering areas such as poverty, health, education, gender equality, and climate action. 


SIA (Social Impact Assessment): A process of identifying, analyzing, and managing the social impacts, both positive and negative, of projects, policies, or activities on affected communities, stakeholders, and broader society.


SRI (Socially Responsible Investment): Investment strategies that consider environmental, social, and governance factors alongside financial returns.


Stewardship Code: A set of principles and guidelines that encourage institutional investors to engage with the companies they invest in and promote long-term value creation while considering ESG factors.


Sustainability: The concept of meeting the needs of the present generation without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs, by balancing economic, environmental, and social considerations.


Sustainability Reporting: The practice of disclosing information about an organization's sustainability performance, impacts, risks, and strategies through dedicated reports, websites, or other communication channels to inform stakeholders and demonstrate accountability.


Sustainability Reporting Standards: Guidelines and frameworks, such as the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) and the Sustainability Accounting Standards Board (SASB), that help companies report their environmental, social, and governance performance.

T

Taxonomy: The EU Taxonomy is a standardized classification system of economic activities that contribute to environmental sustainability. It plays a crucial role in guiding investors, businesses, and policymakers by providing a common language and framework for assessing the environmental performance of economic activities. It sets specific criteria and thresholds that activities must meet to be considered environmentally sustainable, such as greenhouse gas emissions reductions, resource efficiency, pollution prevention, and biodiversity protection.


TCFD (Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures): An organization established by the Financial Stability Board that provides guidelines for companies to disclose climate-related risks and opportunities in their financial reporting.


Triple Bottom Line: A framework that expands the traditional focus on financial performance (the "bottom line") to also consider environmental and social performance, reflecting the three pillars of sustainability—profit, planet, and people.


True Cost Accounting: An approach to accounting and economic analysis that attempts to incorporate the full social and environmental costs of products, services, or activities into pricing and decision-making, aiming to internalize externalities and promote sustainable practices.



Taxonomy: The EU Taxonomy is a standardized classification system of economic activities that contribute to environmental sustainability. It plays a crucial role in guiding investors, businesses, and policymakers by providing a common language and framework for assessing the environmental performance of economic activities. It sets specific criteria and thresholds that activities must meet to be considered environmentally sustainable, such as greenhouse gas emissions reductions, resource efficiency, pollution prevention, and biodiversity protection.


TCFD (Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures): An organization established by the Financial Stability Board that provides guidelines for companies to disclose climate-related risks and opportunities in their financial reporting.


Triple Bottom Line: A framework that expands the traditional focus on financial performance (the "bottom line") to also consider environmental and social performance, reflecting the three pillars of sustainability—profit, planet, and people.


True Cost Accounting: An approach to accounting and economic analysis that attempts to incorporate the full social and environmental costs of products, services, or activities into pricing and decision-making, aiming to internalize externalities and promote sustainable practices.

Taxonomy: The EU Taxonomy is a standardized classification system of economic activities that contribute to environmental sustainability. It plays a crucial role in guiding investors, businesses, and policymakers by providing a common language and framework for assessing the environmental performance of economic activities. It sets specific criteria and thresholds that activities must meet to be considered environmentally sustainable, such as greenhouse gas emissions reductions, resource efficiency, pollution prevention, and biodiversity protection.


TCFD (Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures): An organization established by the Financial Stability Board that provides guidelines for companies to disclose climate-related risks and opportunities in their financial reporting.


Triple Bottom Line: A framework that expands the traditional focus on financial performance (the "bottom line") to also consider environmental and social performance, reflecting the three pillars of sustainability—profit, planet, and people.


True Cost Accounting: An approach to accounting and economic analysis that attempts to incorporate the full social and environmental costs of products, services, or activities into pricing and decision-making, aiming to internalize externalities and promote sustainable practices.

U

UNFCCC (The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change): An international treaty established in 1992 with the objective of stabilizing greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere. It provides a framework for international cooperation on climate change.



UNFCCC (The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change): An international treaty established in 1992 with the objective of stabilizing greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere. It provides a framework for international cooperation on climate change.

UNFCCC (The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change): An international treaty established in 1992 with the objective of stabilizing greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere. It provides a framework for international cooperation on climate change.

W

Waste Management: The collection, transportation, treatment, disposal, and recycling of waste materials in a manner that minimizes environmental impacts, public health risks, and resource depletion, while maximizing resource recovery and circularity.


Water Footprint: The total volume of freshwater used directly or indirectly by an individual, organization, or product throughout its life cycle, including water consumed, polluted, or evaporated, providing insights into water-related impacts and sustainability.


WBCSD (World Business Council for Sustainable Development): A global coalition of businesses committed to advancing sustainable development by integrating sustainability into their strategies, operations, and collaborations.


WFD (Waste Framework Directive): An EU directive that sets out a legal framework for waste management, including waste prevention, recycling, and the landfilling of waste.


WRI (World Resources Institute): A global research organization focused on addressing environmental and sustainability challenges through data-driven analysis, policy research, and practical solutions.



Waste Management: The collection, transportation, treatment, disposal, and recycling of waste materials in a manner that minimizes environmental impacts, public health risks, and resource depletion, while maximizing resource recovery and circularity.


Water Footprint: The total volume of freshwater used directly or indirectly by an individual, organization, or product throughout its life cycle, including water consumed, polluted, or evaporated, providing insights into water-related impacts and sustainability.


WBCSD (World Business Council for Sustainable Development): A global coalition of businesses committed to advancing sustainable development by integrating sustainability into their strategies, operations, and collaborations.


WFD (Waste Framework Directive): An EU directive that sets out a legal framework for waste management, including waste prevention, recycling, and the landfilling of waste.


WRI (World Resources Institute): A global research organization focused on addressing environmental and sustainability challenges through data-driven analysis, policy research, and practical solutions.



Waste Management: The collection, transportation, treatment, disposal, and recycling of waste materials in a manner that minimizes environmental impacts, public health risks, and resource depletion, while maximizing resource recovery and circularity.


Water Footprint: The total volume of freshwater used directly or indirectly by an individual, organization, or product throughout its life cycle, including water consumed, polluted, or evaporated, providing insights into water-related impacts and sustainability.


WBCSD (World Business Council for Sustainable Development): A global coalition of businesses committed to advancing sustainable development by integrating sustainability into their strategies, operations, and collaborations.


WFD (Waste Framework Directive): An EU directive that sets out a legal framework for waste management, including waste prevention, recycling, and the landfilling of waste.


WRI (World Resources Institute): A global research organization focused on addressing environmental and sustainability challenges through data-driven analysis, policy research, and practical solutions.



Låt oss accelerera förändring för bättre affärer och en bättre planet!

Låt oss accelerera förändring för bättre affärer och en bättre planet!

Låt oss accelerera förändring för bättre affärer och en bättre planet!

SustainLab är en SaaS-hållbarhetsplattform som automatiserar insamling, bearbetning och visualisering av hållbarhetsdata, för att hjälpa företag att spendera mindre tid på datahantering och mer på att accelerera förändring.

Copyright @2020-2023 SustainLab Sweden AB.

Nyhetsbrev

SustainLab är en SaaS-hållbarhetsplattform som automatiserar insamling, bearbetning och visualisering av hållbarhetsdata, för att hjälpa företag att spendera mindre tid på datahantering och mer på att accelerera förändring.

Copyright @2020-2023 SustainLab Sweden AB.

Nyhetsbrev

SustainLab är en SaaS-hållbarhetsplattform som automatiserar insamling, bearbetning och visualisering av hållbarhetsdata, för att hjälpa företag att spendera mindre tid på datahantering och mer på att accelerera förändring.

Copyright @2020-2023 SustainLab Sweden AB.

Nyhetsbrev